A week of pkgsrc #13

With the lead up to the release of pkgsrc-2019Q2 I picked up the ball with the testing on OS X Tiger again. It takes about a month for a G4 Mac Mini to attempt a bulk build of the entire pkgsrc tree with compilers usually taking up most days without success. To reduce the turnaround time, I switched to attempting a small subset of packages for a quicker turnaround using meta-pkgs/bulk-large. After a couple of days of compiling I received a report in my mailbox showing breakages in key packages such as OpenSSL and libxml2.

security/openssl issue was a regression upstream which was resolved by bringing the packages up to date.

textproc/libxml2 breakage was due to -Wno-array-bounds being passed to the compiler and the ancient version of GCC in Tiger not supporting it, resulting in a hard cc1: error: unrecognized command line option "-Wno-array-bounds" error. The use of BUILDLINK_TRANSFORM.Darwin here allowed the option to be removed dynamically, on the fly, confined to only being applied during builds on Darwin.

security/libgpg-error needed the definition of __DARWIN_UNIX03 to make use of unsetenv(3) which returns an integer, unsetenv is called inside an if statement and is unable to test the result as Tiger still used the old implementation by default, which returns void. This results in the error sysutils.c:178: error: void value not ignored as it ought to be when building. The fix for this came from macports.

There was many breakages due to the lack of support of strnlen(3) in Tiger, Apple introduced support for this function in Lion, as a workaround, pkgtools/libnbcompat now includes an implementation which will be used in place for packages which specify strnlen as a requirement using USE_FEATURES and the OS is marked as missing the features using _OPSYS_MISSING_FEATURES.

databases/sqlite3 has issues with readline included with Tiger, as a workaround locally, I switched to using gnu readline.

As find(1) in Tiger lacks support for the + parameter for -exec, the ability to install Python egg modules is currently broken, I worked around this locally to progress with the bulk build. Next step possibly is to make pkgsrc aware of find as a tool and substitute legacy versions with a version from sysutils/coreutils perhaps.

devel/re2c was broken due to the ageing version of GNU Bison being called, which again lacked support for a feature.

  GEN      src/ast/parser.cc
/usr/bin/bison: option `--defines' doesn't allow an argument
Usage: /usr/bin/bison [-dhklntvyV] [-b file-prefix] [-o outfile] [-p name-prefix]
       [--debug] [--defines] [--fixed-output-files] [--no-lines]
       [--verbose] [--version] [--help] [--yacc]
       [--no-parser] [--token-table]
       [--file-prefix=prefix] [--name-prefix=prefix]
       [--output=outfile] grammar-file

Making use of the version in pkgsrc instead resolved the issue by specifying bison in USE_TOOLS.

With the advancement of language development and new standards being defined, pkgsrc grew support for specifying which versions of C & C++ language standards a package may require e.g USE_LANGUAGES=c++03. This in turn passes the relevant standard to the compiler using --std= option. If the compiler being used doesn’t support the standard specified all tests in GNU configure to determine the compiler and language support will fail, resulting in a cryptic configure: error: C++ preprocessor "/lib/cpp" fails sanity check (cpp is in /usr/bin on Tiger). As a local workaround I have commented out the block in pkgsrc/mk/compiler.mk so that the standard is not set. Not sure whether a knob to ignore setting the stand standard is worth it or to move forward by enforcing the use of a new (external) toolchain.

With these change, the bulk build result went from 673 packages out of 1878 to 1067 out of 1878. The resulting packages and bootstrap kit are now up on sevan.mit.edu.

Next step is to address support for find in the pkgsrc tools infrastructure, remove setting 64bit mode on G5 macs as a bootstrap mode as Tiger really doesn’t support it.

Thanks to viva PowerPC for the plug.

A glimpse of sevan.mit.edu as it runs currently:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.